5 Things You Should Not Do During A Divorce

Divorce can bring up all kinds of emotions, from sadness to feelings of relief, to downright anger. This is only human when faced with the end of a significant relationship.

But during a divorce, you need to keep mindful of how your behavior will affect the divorce process itself and also how the court will rule based on that behavior.

Don’t Transfer, Conceal, or Retitle Assets

The court doesn’t look kindly on spouses who transfer, conceal, or retitle assets and accounts in an attempt to hide them from their spouse. This will affect your credibility and trustworthiness in the eyes of the court and can adversely affect you in matters of asset division.

If you are concerned about your spouse’s spending, you should look into getting a temporary order placing restrictions on accounts. Be prepared to give this detailed thought since courts will require compelling evidence that this was necessary. Likewise, you should not incur debt in your spouse’s name, as this will also affect your credibility.

Don’t Communicate With Your Spouse With Hostility

Although you may be feeling hostile, your communication should be emotionally tempered. Likewise, don’t involve your children in your arguments or grievances.

The courts can punish spouses who harass, threaten, and emotionally isolate their children from the other. If it is clear that the divorcing couple can’t communicate respectively and cooperatively, this can affect things as important as the custody of your children.

Don’t Forget That Divorce is an Economic Transaction

Vindication may be a driving force right now, but it can be exhausting, both emotionally and financially. Divorces are expensive. If you are remaining adversarial just to win, you may be paying dearly for that financially. Although you don’t want to compromise to your detriment, neither do you want to keep up the fight to your financial detriment. Those divorces that navigate settlements through mediation are often the most successful long-term after getting through the initial emotional pain.

Don’t Post to Social Media

Although social media is part of modern life today, you should take particular care in what you post while navigating a divorce. Unfortunately, posts and photos have been used in divorce proceedings when they exhibit financial extravagance or questionable behavior.

This information may also be used to prove that you don’t provide a safe or suitable environment for your children. Deleting information can also be seen as a destruction of evidence. If you are tempted to post on social media, very carefully consider what you are posting and how it could be interpreted.

Don’t Hide Things From Your Divorce Lawyer

Your divorce lawyer must be prepared to be your staunchest advocate. But hiding things from him or her sets you both up for unpleasant surprises. Damaging information has a sneaky way of coming out at the most inopportune moments. Your attorney cannot be prepared to deal with the facts and circumstances surrounding your divorce if he or she does not know about them.

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